Notes (endnotes and footnotes)

Notes are tagged within the body of the text as normal, then listed after the next break. The book reader compiles them for access by a reader. This dispenses with footnotes and endnotes.

A departure from printed books

It makes little sense in electronic publishing formats to follow the same conventions as printed books. Electronic media can display the content of notes without the reader having to move to another part of the book; an inconvenience even with printed books.

The default behaviour for UBook notes is for the software to “capture” and display them using some kind of floating panel under the reader’s control.

How it works

Notes are managed very simply using a few tags.

  1. {{CONTENT}} is used to indicate the location of the note within the text of the book.
  2. $* is used to record the content of the note. These are placed immediately following the next scene break ($SB) or page break ($PB).

Indicating a note within text

Wrap {{}} around the content being noted.

Here is a note that uses a tradition end-of-sentence asterisk{{*}}.

The tag can also wrap {{text content}} to indicate mid-sentence notes.

Adding the content of notes

Notes are added after the current content, after the next scene or page break ($SB or $PB).

The notes are contained within the $N{{}} tags, and individual notes are identified using $*.

$N{{
$* This is a note.

$* This is a second note right here. These can span many paragraphs if you like.

This is still the second note.

$* This is the third note.
}}

Complex note content

The model intended for notes is content available without leaving the passage of text containing the note marker. This implies some kind of pop up or hover mechanism.

With this in mind, note content can be reasonably complex, allowing for useful information to be placed within the note itself. Examples might include images such as maps, as well as links to related material within the book.

Of the four great battles Alexander fought in the course of his brilliant military career, the {{Battle of the Granicus}}, fought in May 334 BC, was the first–and the one in which he came closest to failure and death.…

$PB

$N{{
$* $$$ Battle of the Granicus
 
$IMG{{/images/Granicus.jpg $CAP Battle of the Granicus (1665), Charles Lebrun, oil on canvas.}}
 
The Battle of the Granicus River in May 334 BC was the first of three major battles fought between Alexander the Great and the Persian Empire. Fought in Northwestern Asia Minor, near the site of Troy, it was here that Alexander defeated the forces of the Persian satraps of Asia Minor, including a large force of Greek mercenaries led by Memnon of Rhodes.
 
$L{{Battle of the Granicus (Wikipedia)==https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Granicus}}
}}

Battle of the Granicus

Battle of the Granicus (1665), Charles Lebrun, oil on canvas.

The Battle of the Granicus River in May 334 BC was the first of three major battles fought between Alexander the Great and the Persian Empire. Fought in Northwestern Asia Minor, near the site of Troy, it was here that Alexander defeated the forces of the Persian satraps of Asia Minor, including a large force of Greek mercenaries led by Memnon of Rhodes.
 
Battle of the Granicus (Wikipedia)

First come first served

The running order is implied; authors and publishers must make sure the notes themselves, indicated at the end using the $* tags, are in the right order.

The software works on a first come first served basis; the first {{}} is automatically linked with the first $*, the second {{}} with the second $* etc.

If by accident there is a discrepancy – there are too many note markers ({{}}) or too many notes ($*) – they are ignored.

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