Paragraphs and line breaks

Anything in a UBook file not marked up is a paragraph. This is why you add tags to everything else.

Paragraphs are automatically rendered when a block of text is followed by an empty line.

How to create paragraphs

Add a line space after a block of text.

This is a sentence that is a paragraph because there is an empty line after it.

This would be a new paragraph because of the empty line above.

Here is a third paragraph.

Line breaks only (not creating paragraphs)

Sometimes you don’t want to create a series of paragraphs. An example would be a non-prose chunk of text, like a poem. A single line break without an empty line prevents the creation of paragraphs.

And thus I clothe my naked villany
With odd old ends stol’n out of holy writ,
And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.

*Richard III* (1.3, 336-338)
William Shakespeare

And thus I clothe my naked villany
With odd old ends stol’n out of holy writ,
And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.

 

Richard III (1.3, 336-338)
William Shakespeare

Extra lines are ignored

White space (empty lines) is ignored. This ensures sloppy manuscripts render well. Only a single blank line is used to determine paragraphs; all others are ignored.

For example, this would be rendered as three paragraphs.

This is paragraph one; just a normal paragraph. All these blank lines will be ignored.

 

 

 

This is the second paragraph. It too has a couple of sentences.

 

 

 

This is the third paragraph, despite the huge number of blank lines above. All of these are completely ignored except the first hard return.

This is paragraph one; just a normal paragraph. All these blank lines will be ignored.

This is the second paragraph. It too has a couple of sentences.

This is the third paragraph, despite the huge number of blank lines above. All of these are completely ignored except the first hard return.

Note: if you wish to add some blank lines that are recognised by the book reader software use the $E (Empty line) tag.

Start paragraphs

A start paragraph is one that begins a new chunk of the book. In a novel, for example, a start paragraph appears at the beginning of a chapter and after a scene break.

The book reader software can then render these differently if required. In print books start paragraphs lack an indent in the opening sentence; all other paragraphs have a small indent.

A start paragraph is automatically forced if it appears after these tags:

  • The use of any header tag e.g. $, $$, $$$ etc;
  • After a scene break ($SB);
  • After a page break ($PB).

See also