Quotes

Add the $Q tag to identify a passage as a quote. It will be picked up by the book reader and styled differently.

How it works

Add the $Q tag to the beginning of a line or paragraph to indicate it is to be treated as a quote.

$Q The atmosphere of orthodoxy is always damaging to prose, and above all it is completely ruinous to the novel, the most anarchical of all forms of literature.
$QR George Orwell

Use the optional $QR tag to identify the reference, author or the source of the quote. This will normally align to the right of the page as is the convention with printed books.

The atmosphere of orthodoxy is always damaging to prose, and above all it is completely ruinous to the novel, the most anarchical of all forms of literature.

— George Orwell

Multi-line quotes

The $Q tag manages paragraphs. Manage a quote with several lines with a single line break (not a blank line).

“Fire and Ice” is one of Robert Frost’s most popular poems, published in December 1920 in *Harper’s Magazine* and in 1923 in his Pulitzer-prize winning book *New Hampshire*.

$Q Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

$QR *Fire and Ice*
Robert Frost

This would be rendered something like this.

“Fire and Ice” is one of Robert Frost’s most popular poems, published in December 1920 in Harper’s Magazine and in 1923 in his Pulitzer-prize winning book New Hampshire.
 

Some say the world will end in fire,

Some say in ice.

From what I’ve tasted of desire

I hold with those who favor fire.

But if it had to perish twice,

I think I know enough of hate

To say that for destruction ice

Is also great

And would suffice.

Fire and Ice

Robert Frost

Stanzas and other multiline-quotes

Quotes passages may span multiple paragraphs or chunks. Each $Q tag works at the block level, so use this to create paragraphs or stanzas etc.

A poem by Charles Bukowski.

$Q when Whitman wrote, “I sing the body electric”

$Q I know what he
meant
I know what he
wanted:

$Q to be completely alive every moment
in spite of the inevitable.

$Q we can’t cheat death but we can make it
work so hard
that when it does take
us

$Q it will have known a victory just as
perfect as
ours.

$QR *a song with no end*
**Charles Bukowski**

A poem by Charles Bukowski.

 

when Whitman wrote, “I sing the body electric”

 

I know what he
meant
I know what he
wanted:

 

to be completely alive every moment
in spite of the inevitable.

 

we can’t cheat death but we can make it
work so hard
that when it does take
us

 

it will have known a victory just as
perfect as
ours.

 

a song with no end
Charles Bukowski

See also

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