$TOCL (Table of contents link)

The $TOCL tag is used to capture anything you want to appear in the table of contents for the book, typically truncated versions of chapter names and section names. It is used throughout the manuscript – wherever you expect the reader to jump to when they click the link in the table of contents e.g. at the beginning of a chapter.

How it works

The $TOCL tag is used with a string of text, usually just before the chapter or section name.

$TOCL 3. The Valley of Fear
$$ CHAPTER III
$ The Valley of Fear
Note: The string of text is hidden and never displayed on the page where it is recorded.

This is what the page would look like in the book, with the content of the $TOCL tag invisible.

CHAPTER III

The Valley of Fear

The hidden text is instead used in the background to identify the chapter or section you are linking to. This would be rendered in the table of contents as a clickable link, using the exact text recorded.

Contents

1. The Lake of Doom
2. The Mountain of Desperation
3. The Valley of Fear
4. The Road to Nowhere
5. The Cauldron of Vitriol
6. The Seething Box of Shame
7. The Field of Nightmares

The $TOCL tag enables authors and publishers to control the text that appears in the table of contents. The text used is literal; if you wish your table of contents to use numbers or Roman numerals, for example, that is what you add to the $TOCL tag.

Using $TOCL to link to other parts of the book

In complex books, such as manuals or textbooks with chapters, sections and subsections, the $TOCL tag is handy to create a detailed table of contents with little effort. They are not just used for chapters.

$TOCL 2.2 Cleaning the Drive Mechanism
$$ Section 2.2 Cleaning the Drive Mechanism

Clicking the link in the table of contents will jump the reader to the exact part of the book where the $TOCL tag was placed, even if part way down the page.

In the example above, we would end up with the text included in your table of contents even if the section is buried within a chapter.


2 The Drive Mechanism
2.1 Overview of the Drive and its Main Functions
2.2 Cleaning the Drive Mechanism
2.3 Understanding the Hydraulic Control Unit
2.4 Leakage and Maintenance of the Alternative Control Unit

Since the $TOCL tags are added wherever they are targeted in the text it is relatively easy for authors or book designers to build up even very complex tables of content with little effort.

Complex tables of content

In simple books, such as novels, the above examples are fine as only a single level of content is needed. In complex works, like textbooks containing major parts, chapters, sections and sub-sections, a more hierarchical table of contents is often used.

This is easily accomplished using the same method. Each $TOCL tag can be extended using extra $ symbols to embed its level. $TOCL is level one, $$TOCL is level two, and so on.

These tags, for example, might be scattered about a UBook file.

$TOCL Preface

$TOCL Introductory
$$TOCL A Sketch Of The History Of Political Economy
$$TOCL Preliminary Remarks

// Level 1 TOCL
$TOCL Book I – Production

// Level 2 TOCL
$$TOCL Chapter I. Of The Requisites Of Production

// Level 3 TOCLs
$$$TOCL § 1. The requisites of production
$$$TOCL § 2. The Second Requisite of Production, Labor
$$$TOCL § 3. Of Capital as a Requisite of Production
$$TOCL Chapter II. Of Unproductive Labor
$$$TOCL § 1. Definition of Productive and Unproductive Labor
$$$TOCL § 2. Productive and Unproductive Consumption
$$$TOCL § 3. Distinction Between Labor for the Supply of Productive Consumption and Labor for the Supply of Unproductive Consumption
$$TOCL Chapter III. Of Capital
$$$TOCL § 1. Capital is Wealth Appropriated to Reproductive Employment
$$$TOCL § 2. More Capital Devoted to Production than Actually Employed in it
$$$TOCL § 3. Examination of Cases Illustrative of the Idea of Capital

// Level 1 TOCL
$TOCL Book II – Distribution

// Level 2 TOCL
$$TOCL Chapter I. Of Property

// Level 3 TOCLs
$$$TOCL § 1. Individual Property and its opponents
$$$TOCL § 2. The case for Communism against private property presented
$$$TOCL § 3. The Socialists who appeal to state-help
$$$TOCL § 4. Of various minor schemes, Communistic and Socialistic
$$$TOCL § 5. The Socialist objections to the present order of Society examined
$$$TOCL § 6. Property in land different from property in Movables
$$TOCL Chapter II. Of Wages
$$$TOCL § 1. Of Competition and Custom
$$$TOCL § 2. The Wages-fund, and the Objections to it Considered
$$$TOCL § 3. Examination of some popular Opinions respecting Wages
$$$TOCL § 4. Certain rare Circumstances excepted, High Wages imply Restraints on Population
$$$TOCL § 5. Due Restriction of Population the only Safeguard of a Laboring-Class

// Level 1 TOCL
$TOCL Book III – Exchange

// Level 2 TOCL
$$TOCL Chapter I. Of Value

// Level 3 TOCLs
$$$TOCL § 1. Definitions of Value in Use, Exchange Value, and Price
$$$TOCL § 2. Conditions of Value: Utility, Difficulty of Attainment, and Transferableness
$$$TOCL § 3. Commodities limited in Quantity by the law of Demand and Supply: General working of this Law
$$TOCL Chapter II. Ultimate Analysis Of Cost Of Production
$$$TOCL § 1. Of Labor, the principal Element in Cost of Production
$$$TOCL § 2. Wages affect Values, only if different in different employments; “non-competing groups.”
$$$TOCL § 3. Profits an element in Cost of Production
$$$TOCL § 4. Cost of Production properly represented by sacrifice, or cost, to the Laborer as well as to the Capitalist; the relation of this conception to the Cost of Labor

$TOCL Appendix I – Bibliographies
$TOCL Appendix II – Examination Questions

This would produce a complex table of contents like so:

  • Preface
  • Introductory
    • A Sketch Of The History Of Political Economy
    • Preliminary Remarks
  • Book I – Production
    • Chapter I. Of The Requisites Of Production
      • § 1. The requisites of production
      • § 2. The Second Requisite of Production, Labor
      • § 3. Of Capital as a Requisite of Production
    • Chapter II. Of Unproductive Labor
      • § 1. Definition of Productive and Unproductive Labor
      • § 2. Productive and Unproductive Consumption
      • § 3. Distinction Between Labor for the Supply of Productive Consumption and Labor for the Supply of Unproductive Consumption
    • Chapter III. Of Capital
      • § 1. Capital is Wealth Appropriated to Reproductive Employment
      • § 2. More Capital Devoted to Production than Actually Employed in it
      • § 3. Examination of Cases Illustrative of the Idea of Capital
  • Book II – Distribution
    • Chapter I. Of Property
      • § 1. Individual Property and its opponents
      • § 2. The case for Communism against private property presented
      • § 3. The Socialists who appeal to state-help
      • § 4. Of various minor schemes, Communistic and Socialistic
      • § 5. The Socialist objections to the present order of Society examined
      • § 6. Property in land different from property in Movables
    • Chapter II. Of Wages
      • § 1. Of Competition and Custom
      • § 2. The Wages-fund, and the Objections to it Considered
      • § 3. Examination of some popular Opinions respecting Wages
      • § 4. Certain rare Circumstances excepted, High Wages imply Restraints on Population
      • § 5. Due Restriction of Population the only Safeguard of a Laboring-Class
  • Book III – Exchange
    • Chapter I. Of Value
      • § 1. Definitions of Value in Use, Exchange Value, and Price
      • § 2. Conditions of Value: Utility, Difficulty of Attainment, and Transferableness
      • § 3. Commodities limited in Quantity by the law of Demand and Supply: General working of this Law
    • Chapter II. Ultimate Analysis Of Cost Of Production
      • § 1. Of Labor, the principal Element in Cost of Production
      • § 2. Wages affect Values, only if different in different employments; "non-competing groups."
      • § 3. Profits an element in Cost of Production
      • § 4. Cost of Production properly represented by sacrifice, or cost, to the Laborer as well as to the Capitalist; the relation of this conception to the Cost of Labor
  • Appendix I – Bibliographies
  • Appendix II – Examination Questions

This means authors and compilers can easily create very complex, hierarchical tables of contents and jump menus with little effort. Book designers can then target the different levels of content or menus to style them in distinctive ways.

How $TOCLs are used

All the $TOCLs are compiled by the book reader software. They are used to display the list of contents at the start of the book (where you place the $TOC tag), and as a quick reference for readers to access the book’s contents (the table of contents available from a dropdown list, for example).

When a reader clicks the link they are taken to the page where the $TOCL tag appears (hence the reason it sits above a chapter or section heading).

They are compiled in the exact order they appear in the book.

Note: the correct use of $TOCL tags throughout the book is absolutely crucial. It is the only method of creating a table of contents to guide the reader.

See also

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